Amicus Curiae Observations by the Bangladeshi Non-Governmental Representatives (pursuant to Rule 103 of the Rules) on the “Prosecution’s Request for a Ruling on Jurisdiction under Article 19(3) of the Statute”

Download

- Stars (0)

Share
DescriptionPreviewVersions
Amicus Curiae Observations by the Bangladeshi Non-Governmental Representatives (pursuant to Rule 103 of the Rules) on the “Prosecution’s Request for a Ruling on Jurisdiction under Article 19(3) of the Statute”.PDF

Amicus Curiae Observations by the Bangladeshi Non-Governmental Representatives (pursuant to Rule 103 of the Rules) on the “Prosecution’s Request for a Ruling on Jurisdiction under Article 19(3) of the Statute” of deportation of persons from the territory of Myanmar (a State not party to the Statute persecution of the Rohingya by the Myanmar State from the time of the military takeover in 1. On 14 June 2018, Pre-Trial Chamber I (the “Chamber”) of the International Criminal Court (the “Court”), granted the Bangladeshi Non-Governmental Representatives (“BNGR”) leave to submit amicus curiae observations on the “Prosecution’s Request for a Ruling on Jurisdiction under Article 19(3) of the Statute” (the “Request”). 1 2. BNGR are an informal group of leading Bangladeshi civil society organisations, humanitarian agencies, eminent jurists, human rights advocates and respected scholars who have worked extensively with the Rohingya people allegedly deported from Myanmar into Bangladesh and on issues related to their deportation. A full list of all BNGR members is attached at Annex A. BNGR are assisted in this submission by international lawyers, including barristers from Red Lion Chambers, London, and a team of Bangladeshi researchers, including from among BNGR members, a list of whom is attached at Annex B. 3. BNGR files this amicus curiae brief on three areas of its expertise as per its request for leave: i) the circumstances surrounding the presence of members of the Rohingya people from Myanmar on the territory of Bangladesh; ii) the crimes, in addition to deportation, that commenced in Myanmar but were completed in Bangladesh that the Chamber may exercise territorial jurisdiction over; and iii) an overview of Bangladeshi law on territorial jurisdiction over cross-border crimes.

0 Comments

Let Us Discuss This News

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.